Media Advisory

UF experts on red tide and harmful algal bloom

Please visit https://www.flseagrant.org/news/2018/07/watching-and-waiting-uncertainty-about-when-algae-blooms-will-end/ for regular updates from Florida Sea Grant researchers on the algal bloom situation in Florida.

The following University of Florida researchers are available to speak to reporters on a range of topics related to red tide and algal bloom scholarship and research. Please see a list of resources at the end of this list for links to content related to red tide and algal bloom.

Charles M. Adams, professor, Food and Resource Economics Department, UF/IFAS; marine economics specialist, Florida Sea Grant

Research interests: Economic issues related to marine fisheries management, seafood market and demand, marine aquaculture feasibility, coastal industry activity and impact and changes in coastal environment conditions

Adams has served on the Scientific and Statistical Committee of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Fisheries Management Councils and currently serves as a task force member for the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission.

cmadams@ufl.edu

352-294-7667

Karl Havens, professor, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, UF/IFAS; director, Florida Sea Grant

Research interest: Response of aquatic ecosystems to natural and human-caused stressors including hurricanes, drought, climate change, eutrophication, invasive species and toxic materials

Havens is a member of the Florida Oceans and Coastal Resources Council, which provides the Florida Legislature with an annual research plan addressing critical coastal issues; the Florida Ocean Alliance, a non-partisan organization dedicated to bringing together government, academic and private sectors in Florida to protect and enhance the coastal and ocean resources; and the Florida Institute of Oceanography. He has served as chair of the UF Oil Spill Task Force and currently is chair of the UF Oyster Recovery Team, which is dealing with the collapse of an historic oyster fishery in Apalachicola Bay.

khavens@ufl.edu

352-392-5870

Mark V. Hoyer, director, Florida LAKEWATCH program, UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

Research interests: Interrelationships of water chemistry, aquatic macrophyte communities, fish populations and aquatic bird populations

Hoyer also has studied nutrient loading models and the relationship between in-lake nutrients and chlorophyll.

myhoyer@ufl.edu

352-273-3611

Sherry L. Larkin, associate dean for research and associate director, Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

Research interest: Sustainable use of marine resources

Larkin is actively involved in fisheries management, serving on scientific committees for both the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Councils. In addition to seafood and fisheries, Dr. Larkin’s recent research has focused on economic issues related to forestry, precision farming, harmful algal blooms and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

slarkin@ufl.edu

352-294-7676

Rafael Munoz-Carpena, professor, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, UF/IFAS

Research interests: Hydrology and ecological systems analysis, hydrology and water quality monitoring and modeling, uncertainty and sensitivity of environmental models

In addition to traditional hydrology – studying how water moves through the environment – Munoz-Carpena incorporates ecological factors, such as the impact of water use on plants, animals and the local environment, and uses computer modeling to quantify effects and create mathematically based management tools.

carpena@ufl.edu

352-392-1864, ext. 287

Edward J. Phlips, professor, UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

Research interest: Optimization of algae species for biofuels production

Phlips research focuses on the Suwannee River estuary, located in Florida’s Big Bend region, and on the Indian River Lagoon along Florida’s east coast. He initiated a toxic algae research program with the goal of evaluating the distribution, causes and consequences of harmful algae in freshwater and marine ecosystems.

phlips@ufl.edu

352-273-3603

The following University of Florida researcher is available to speak to reporters about potential impacts on tourism as the result of red tide and algal bloom.

Lori Pennington-Gray, professor and associate director, Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, UF College of Health and Human Performance

Research interests: Tourism planning and development, tourism crisis management

Pennington-Gray’s research aims to provide destinations with research findings that will allow them to make informed policy choices to more successfully market their destinations. She has worked with non-profits, private sector businesses, governments and residents to mitigate environmental and social impacts to host destinations while improving economic impact to the host society.

Additional resources:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe711

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg142

Academic papers from UF/IFAS researchers:

Havens, K. E. 2012. Effects of climate change on the eutrophication of lakes and estuaries. SGEF-189. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and Florida Sea Grant College Program. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg127

Havens, K. E. 2015. Climate change and the occurrence of harmful microorganisms in Florida’s ocean and coastal waters. SGEF216. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and Florida Sea Grant College Program. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg136

Havens, K. E., and T. Frazer. 2012. Rethinking the role of nitrogen and phosphorus in the eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems. SGEF-190. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and Florida Sea Grant College Program. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg118

Havens, K. E., M. V. Hoyer, and E. J. Phlips. 2016. Natural climate variability can influence cyanobacteria blooms in Florida Lakes and Reservoirs. SGEF-234. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and Florida Sea Grant College Program. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/sg142

Havens, K. E., G. Ji, J. R. Beaver, R. S. Fulton III, and C. E. Teacher. 2017. "Dynamics of cyanobacteria blooms are linked to the hydrology of shallow Florida lakes and provide insight into possible impacts of climate change." Hydrobiologia, DOI: 10.1007/S10750-017-3425-7

Havens, K. E., and H. W. Paerl. 2015. "Climate change at a crossroad for control of harmful algal blooms." Environmental Science and Technology, DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b03990.

Paerl, H. W., W. S. Gardner, K. E. Havens, A. R. Joyner, M. J. McCarthy, S. E. Newell, B. Qin, and J. T. Scott. 2015. "Mitigating cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms in aquatic ecosystems impacted by climate change and anthropogenic nutrients." Invited Review, Harmful Algae, Online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hal.2015.09.009

Paerl, H. W., T. Scott, M. J. McCarthy, S. Newell, W. S. Gardner, K. E. Havens, W. Wurtsbaugh, and S. W. Wilhelm. 2016. "It takes two to tango: why dual nutrient (N&P) reductions are now the rule rather than the exception for eutrophication and harmful algal bloom control along the freshwater to marine continuum." Environmental Science and Technology, DOI 10.1021/acs.est.6b02575.