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UF, Moffitt researchers find blood cancer may be more common than realized

UF, Moffitt researchers find blood cancer may be more common than realized

Published: Dec 20th, 2011

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A group of life-threatening blood disorders collectively called myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS, may occur four times more often than reported by national cancer registries, according to new research from the University of Florida based on data from Medicare claims.

UF researchers develop first method to accurately measure zinc in humans

UF researchers develop first method to accurately measure zinc in humans

Published: Dec 15th, 2011

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Zinc is an essential nutrient, but until now, there has not been an effective way to measure it in our bodies, say University of Florida researchers.

Study aims to prevent underage drinking in American Indian communities

Study aims to prevent underage drinking in American Indian communities

Published: Dec 12th, 2011

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The University of Florida’s Institute for Child Health Policy in partnership with Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health Services has received a $4.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study ways to prevent underage drinking.

Satellite imagery helps researchers track, potentially control, disease

Satellite imagery helps researchers track, potentially control, disease

Published: Dec 8th, 2011

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – Using satellite images to measure nighttime light levels streaming from West African cities could prove to be an important new tool in fighting the spread of measles, according to a new study.

UF veterinarians hope new gene chip will help detect, treat West Nile virus in horses and humans

UF veterinarians hope new gene chip will help detect, treat West Nile virus in horses and humans

Published: Dec 7th, 2011

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A new “gene chip” developed at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine sheds light on brain response in horses infected with West Nile virus and could lead to better ways to diagnose and treat both equines and humans, researchers said.

High blood pressure may point to hidden health problems for kids in the ER

High blood pressure may point to hidden health problems for kids in the ER

Published: Dec 1st, 2011

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — More than half of children admitted to an urban Florida pediatric emergency department had elevated blood pressure, according to a study published in the journal Pediatric Emergency Care.

UF receives $1.1 million to support behavioral health training, research partnerships in India

UF receives $1.1 million to support behavioral health training, research partnerships in India

Published: Nov 28th, 2011

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The University of Florida has received $1.1 million to offer behavioral health training to colleagues in three Indian cities and increase research opportunities between the university and Indian partners.

Giving thanks for life after lung transplant 10 years ago

Giving thanks for life after lung transplant 10 years ago

Published: Nov 22nd, 2011

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — She spent Thanksgiving with friends in Cedar Key that year, eating dinner and watching as a few of the men put up walls in the house being built on the land. But it was the call she received as they drove home across the Cedar Key bridge that Debbie Labud will always remember.

Large-scale study sheds light on painful jaw disorder

Large-scale study sheds light on painful jaw disorder

Published: Nov 10th, 2011

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A large clinical study of painful jaw problems commonly known as TMD disorders has revealed a wide range of findings, including how women apparently grow more vulnerable to the condition as they age.

Under lab conditions, Salmonella can reach tomato fruits through leaves, UF study shows

Under lab conditions, Salmonella can reach tomato fruits through leaves, UF study shows

Published: Nov 9th, 2011

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Food-safety experts have long believed that Salmonella bacteria could only enter tomatoes through wounds in the stem or fruit — but a new University of Florida laboratory study shows it can also happen another way.