Sciences Subscribe to RSS Feed

Wildlife corridors sometimes help invasive species spread, UF research finds

Published: August 6 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – When the ants come marching in, having miles of linked habitats may not be such a good idea after all.

UF study advances 'DNA revolution,' tells butterflies' evolutionary history

Published: July 30 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- By tracing nearly 3,000 genes to the earliest common ancestor of butterflies and moths, University of Florida scientists have created an extensive “Tree of Lepidoptera” in the first study to use large-scale, next-generation DNA sequencing.

Lead in teeth can tell a body’s tale, UF study finds

Published: July 30 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – Your teeth can tell stories about you, and not just that you always forget to floss.

Researchers find new fertility drug to be more effective than one used for past 40 years

Published: July 25 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A fertility drug used for more than four decades could soon be replaced with another drug that is 30 percent more effective in helping women become pregnant, according to a study with University of Florida ties.

UF launches newest preeminence initiative aimed at biodiversity

Published: July 23 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The variety and abundance of plants, animals and insects in a given area define its environmental health. Each plays a critical part, and imbalances can lead to catastrophe — not only for the species but also for humans.

UF research shows rhymes can inspire reasoning during the third trimester in the womb

Published: July 22 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Mozart, Beethoven or even Shakespeare — pregnant mothers have been known to expose their babies to many forms of auditory stimulation. But according to researchers at the University of Florida, all a baby really needs is the music of mom’s voice.

Medical entrepreneur pledges $1 million to new chemistry building

Published: July 17 2014

A preeminent university should have first-class chemistry facilities. That belief inspired Dr. Howard Sheridan and his wife, Brenda, both University of Florida alumni, to pledge $1 million toward a new chemistry and chemical biology building at UF.

IFAS assistant professor Andrea Lucky and her citizen science specimen collection project, known as the School of Ants.

With a little help, citizen scientists can be good proxies, research shows

Published: July 7 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – Anyone can collect ant data as accurately as experts, if they have a bit of guidance and the right tools: cookies, index cards and plastic zip-top bags.

Deforestation remedies can have unintended consequences, UF researchers say

Published: July 2 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- When it comes to fixing deforestation and forest degradation, good intentions can lead to bad outcomes.

Great White Shark population in good health along California coast, UF study finds

Published: June 16 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- The Great White Shark is not endangered in the Eastern North Pacific, and, in fact, is doing well enough that its numbers likely are growing, according to an international research team led by a University of Florida researcher.

Perennial corn crops? It could happen with new plant-breeding tool developed at UF/IFAS

Published: June 10 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Since the first plant genome sequence was obtained for the plant Arabidopsis in 2000, scientists have gene-sequenced everything from cannabis to castor bean.

Retracing citrus’ earliest roots to find clues for healthier future

Published: June 9 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- That orange you’re enjoying may have been grown in Florida, but its deepest ancestral roots stretch back more than 5 million years, all the way to two wild citrus species from Southeast Asia.

UF study names ancient crocodilian featured in Titanoboa documentary

Published: May 23 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A new University of Florida study describes a 16-foot, 900-pound ancient species of crocodilian that swam in the same rivers as Titanoboa 60 million years ago in the world’s oldest-known rain forest.

New chemical language of neural systems is revealed

Published: May 21 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Comb jellies – a seemingly simple form of marine life — took a radically different path to neural complexity than the rest of the animal kingdom, a finding that could have implications for synthetic and regenerative medicine, new University of Florida research shows.

UF scientists discover over 100 species in drive to document biodiversity

Published: May 14 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A 5-million-year-old saber-toothed cat, the world’s oldest grape and a bizarre hermit crab were among more than 100 new species discovered by University of Florida scientists last year.

A first: Real-time genome-scale sequencing at sea

Published: April 28 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A University of Florida researcher has become the first scientist to achieve genome-scale sequencing and analysis of fragile marine creatures at sea aboard a ship and in real time.

UF/IFAS researchers help to sequence genome for loblolly pine major source of lumber, paper

Published: March 20 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — To look at the humble loblolly pine – grown in neat rows on large farms throughout the southeastern U.S. and milled for things like building lumber and paper – you would never think that its genetic code is seven times larger than a human’s

Sea snakes need fresh water for drinking, UF researcher finds

Published: March 18 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Although they spend their lives surrounded by water, sea snakes dehydrate for months at a time, waiting to quench their thirst with fresh water from rainfall, a University of Florida biologist has found.

UF/IFAS scientists to conduct experiment on plants in space

Published: March 11 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Two University of Florida scientists will go to Kennedy Space Center March 16 for the launch of the SpaceX-3 Dragon capsule to the International Space Station, to send up and then monitor an experiment designed to help them understand biological functions in space.

UF researchers find drug therapy that could eventually reverse memory decline in seniors

Published: March 5 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — It may seem normal: As we age, we misplace car keys, or can’t remember a name we just learned or a meal we just ordered. But University of Florida researchers say memory trouble doesn’t have to be inevitable, and they’ve found a drug therapy that could potentially reverse this type of memory decline.