Sciences Subscribe to RSS Feed

Dr. Heather Walden looks on while John Slapcinsky of UF’s Florida Museum of Natural History dissects a snail.

UF researchers: Rare parasite colonizing snails in South Florida

Published: February 25 2015

A rare parasite that can cause sickness in humans and animals is present in more species of snails in Florida than previously thought, potentially putting people and pets who eat snails at risk.

Tropical turtle discovery in Wyoming provides climate-change clues

Published: February 23 2015

Tropical turtle fossils discovered in Wyoming by University of Florida scientists reveal that when the earth got warmer, prehistoric turtles headed north. But if today’s turtles try the same technique to cope with warming habitats, they might run into trouble.

Moths shed light on how to fool enemy sonar

Published: February 17 2015

A new study shows that moths can outsmart sonar with a flick of their long tails.

The coast of the northern Adriatic in Rimini, Italy, near one of the study sites that showed that human activities could be altering ecosystems that have been immune to major changes for centuries. Photo: Thinkstock/Getty Images

Humans altering Adriatic ecosystems more than nature, UF study shows

Published: February 13 2015

The ecosystems of the Adriatic Sea have weathered natural climate shifts for 125,000 years, but humans could be rapidly altering this historically stable biodiversity hot spot, a University of Florida study says.

Shark attack deaths down in 2014, UF says

Published: February 11 2015

Three people died worldwide from shark attacks last year, far below the average of 6.3 deaths per year over the past decade, according to the International Shark Attack File report released by the University of Florida today.

UF/IFAS awarded funding to fight citrus greening

Published: February 9 2015

esearchers at the University of Florida Institute of Agricultural Sciences have been awarded more than $13.4 million for four studies to help fight citrus greening, the devastating disease that threatens Florida’s $10 billion citrus industry.

Study co-author J. Angel Soto-Centeno displays the fossilized skull of a Cuban fruit bat, Brachyphylla nana.

Fossils link Caribbean bat extinction to humans, not climate change

Published: January 22 2015

Sharing caves with millions of bats, the Caribbean’s first humans may have driven some species of the winged mammals to extinction.

New UF study reveals oldest primate lived in trees

Published: January 20 2015

Say “primate” and most people wouldn’t think of a tree-dwelling, squirrel-like creature that weighs no more than a deck of playing cards, but a new study suggests that may perfectly describe humans’ earliest primate ancestors.

UF/IFAS study: Wheat yield to decline as temperatures increase

Published: January 13 2015

For every degree Celsius that the temperature increases, the world stands to lose 6 percent of its wheat crop, according to a new global study led by a University of Florida scientist. That’s one fourth of the annual global wheat trade, which reached 147 million tons in 2013.

Climate change already showing effects at Kennedy Space Center

Published: December 5 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- The effects of climate change are already showing up in places from Miami to Alaska, scientists say, but two University of Florida geologists are focusing their attention on one especially noteworthy and vulnerable piece of waterfront real estate: Kennedy Space Center.

University of Florida scientists think they’ve found the first potential biological control strategy against laurel wilt, a disease that threatens Florida’s avocado industry. The redbay ambrosia beetle, see here, bores holes into avocado trees, bringing the disease that causes laurel wilt.
Credit: Lyle Buss, UF/IFAS

UF/IFAS scientists find potential biological control for avocado-ravaging disease

Published: December 2 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- University of Florida scientists believe they’ve found what could be the first biological control strategy against laurel wilt, a disease that threatens the state’s $54 million-a-year avocado industry.

Pratap Pullammanappallil, a UF associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering, poses with an anaerobic digester used in a process he developed at NASA’s request to turn human waste into rocket fuel. Photo by Amy Stuart, UF/IFAS Communications.

Process converts human waste into rocket fuel

Published: November 25 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Buck Rogers surely couldn’t have seen this one coming, but at NASA’s request, University of Florida researchers have figured out how to turn human waste -- yes, that kind -- into rocket fuel.

Lindsay Mehrkam, a UF doctoral student in psychology, delivers Larry the tortoise’s preferred enrichment: a neck rub.

The Human Touch: New research suggests animals prefer human connections

Published: November 19 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- What do animals really want? A new study from the University of Florida suggests it might be human contact, at least in the case of some Galapagos tortoises.

As elephants go, so go the trees: Research shows hunting can have catastrophic effects on tropical forests

Published: November 18 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Overhunting has been disastrous for elephants, but their forest habitats have also been caught in the crossfire.

UF researchers grow norovirus in human cells

Published: November 6 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- University of Florida researchers have grown a human norovirus in a cell culture dish, finally opening the door to developing medications for fighting the intestinal scourge that strikes tens of millions every year in schools, hotels and cruise ships worldwide.

UF/IFAS mosquito-feeding study may help stem dangerous viruses

Published: November 5 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Mosquitoes bite male birds nearly twice as often as they bite females, a finding that may help scientists understand how to stem some viruses from spreading to humans, new University of Florida research shows.

UF physicists win two top international awards

Published: October 27 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Each year, the American Physical Society prizes honor the world’s leading physicists. This year, two of those coveted awards are going to researchers at the University of Florida.

Analysis of 1.25 million scientific articles finds international collaboration can increase impact

Published: October 8 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- International collaboration tends to boost the profile of the science for all researchers involved, but collaborating with certain countries provides more of a scientific impact than others.

UF: Answer to restoring lost island biodiversity found in fossils

Published: September 22 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Many native species have vanished from tropical islands because of human impact, but University of Florida scientists have discovered how fossils can be used to restore lost biodiversity.

NSF awards $7.5 million to UF-led effort to digitize biodiversity collections

Published: August 25 2014

GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- The National Science Foundation has awarded six grants totaling about $7.5 million to digitize biodiversity collections, a nationwide effort coordinated by the iDigBio program based at the University of Florida.