UF ’s Historic Preservation Program to host mid-century modern homes tour

Published: February 13th, 2013

Category: Announcements, InsideUF, Top Stories

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The University of Florida historic preservation program is hosting a Mid-Century Modern Home Tour in northwest Gainesville from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.

The tour coincides with the second annual Preservation South Conference hosted by the UF Historic Preservation Student and Alumni Organization. The conference theme is Southern Modern. Proceeds from the tour will benefit both Alachua Habitat for Humanity and the UF historic preservation program.

The cost of the tour is $10 and will highlight five area examples of mid-century modern architecture. The primary purpose of the tour is to raise awareness and appreciation of homes and other buildings constructed during the 1950s and 1960s. The homes can be toured in any order: 1511 NW 38th St., 1540 NW 37th Terrace, 6651 NW 20th Place, 1004 NW 34th St. and 1404 NW 14th Ave.

UF students from the College of Design, Construction and Planning as well as board members of the Alachua Habitat for Humanity will be on hand to offer tours of each home. Information will be provided about the architect, builder, materials used and each homes unique features that associate it with mid-century modern design.

The tour is sponsored by McGriff Williams Insurance, Walker Architects, Pillar to Post Home Inspection, Gibraltar Title Insurance Agency, Dawn Realty, the University of Florida historic preservation program, Habitat for Humanity, Gainesville360.com, Pepine Realty and the Gainesville Sun.

For information about UF’s historic preservation program and its efforts to preserve mid-century modern sites, contact Marty Hylton, Director of Historic Preservation at 352-219-4122, mhylton@dcp.ufl.edu or visit http://www.dcp.ufl.edu/historic-preservation.

For information about the Mid-Century Modern Home Tour or to become a sponsor, please contact Mike Hastings at 352-538-1092 or mike@mhastings.com.

Credits

Writer
Katelyn Oropeza, koropeza@dcp.ufl.edu

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