Archive for May 2009 Subscribe to RSS Feed

Orlando Sentinel: Becca Gray

Published: May 19th, 2009

Postdoctoral fellow Becca Gray was quoted in a May 6 Orlando Sentinel story about a team of UF biologists that has joined other world experts on evolutionary biology to publish […]

Washington Post: Mary Brownell

Published: May 19th, 2009

Mary Brownell, a professor of special education, was quoted in a May 5 Washington Post story about the constant demand for special education teachers.

Shark Safety

Published: May 19th, 2009

Memorial Day weekend signals the unofficial start of summer and the start of both beach and shark season. With tips on how to best avoid an attack, here’s UF shark […]

UF food scientists call for new science in food safety

Published: May 19th, 2009

Tip sheet

Young Alumni recognized at 2009 Outstanding Young Alumni Awards ceremony

Published: May 19th, 2009

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The University of Florida Alumni Association recognized 31 former UF students at the 2009 Outstanding Young Alumni Awards on April 18 at Emerson Alumni Hall. The Outstanding […]

Research: Mockingbirds, no bird brains, can recognize a face in a crowd

Research: Mockingbirds, no bird brains, can recognize a face in a crowd

Published: May 18th, 2009

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The birds are watching. They know who you are. And they will attack.

University of Florida study provides insight into evolution of first flowers

University of Florida study provides insight into evolution of first flowers

Published: May 18th, 2009

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Charles Darwin described the sudden origin of flowering plants about 130 million years ago as an abominable mystery, one that scientists have yet to solve.

Birds Attack

Published: May 18th, 2009

It turns out mockingbirds may be keeping a close eye on you and me and research shows they can even tell us apart. A new University of Florida study shows that mockingbirds seem to be able to distinguish between individual humans.

Birds Attack

Published: May 18th, 2009

It turns out mockingbirds may be keeping a close eye on you and me, and research shows they can even tell us apart.

Multimedia: Research: Mockingbirds, no bird brains, can recognize a face in a crowd

Multimedia: Research: Mockingbirds, no bird brains, can recognize a face in a crowd

Published: May 18th, 2009

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The birds are watching. They know who you are. And they will attack.